kirchara: Kirchara orchid by me (Kirchara)
I told J that in Shakespeare, comedies mean happy endings, and therefore there’s always a wedding in Act V. I gave him the example of Theseus and Hippolyta's wedding in A Midsummer Night's Dream.
Me: "How about Twelfth Night? Who do you think get married in Act V?"

J: "Olivia and Cesario."

Olivia/Cesario's Willow Cabin speech must have made quite an impact on him ;-)

I have been using Ken Ludwig’s How To Teach Your Children Shakespeare with J since summer 2015 (he was seven). He has learned passages from MND and Twelfth Night (Orsino's "If music be the food of love," Viola's "Conceal me what I am," and the willow cabin speech.) The book also provides summarized plot of the plays for context.

J did memorize several poems before we dove into Shakespeare. Both of us knew that he was perfectly capable of memorizing entire poems, including long ones.



04/50 learning moment ☆ 04/100 moments in multiples of 50 words
kirchara: Fingers on page (Fingers on page)
J is eight years old and have started third grade. His daily homework includes reading for 20-30 minutes and answering "What did you read about?"

I'm taking the opportunity to have him write mini book reports (2-3 sentences).

To help him organize his thoughts, we're using the story sequence chart from IEW*'s Teaching Writing: Structure and Style Unit III: Summarizing Narrative Stories.
I. Who?
When?
Where?


II. What do they need or want?
What do they think?
What do they say and do?

(Why?)

III. How is the need resolved?

I ask him the questions and write down his answers. He has learned the “-ly” adverbs and the who-which clause dress-ups.

J just finished Roald Dahl's Matilda; his first mini book-report is about the book’s ending. We're taking a break from the Hobbit and picked up Narnia again with Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

* Institute of Excellence in Writing



03/50 learning moment ☆ 03/100 moments in multiples of 50 words
kirchara: An orange peeling. "I'm burlesque." (Burlesque orange)
I came across June Oberlander’s Slow and Steady Get Me Ready in a blog post about making room time CDs for little ones. We had the opportunity to try out one of the activities* earlier today.

Instead of making a cardboard egg puzzle, we simply used colorful plastic Easter eggs. I set one egg on a "wall" (a heavy book standing on its side), then made the egg fall and come apart while singing this rhyme:
Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall
All the king's horses and all the king's men
Could not put Humpty together again.


My two-year-old M quickly took over, making the eggs fall and "break" and putting them together again. When the eggs fall, he would exclaim "Oop!" because M is one dramatic toddler.

For extra verisimilitude, you/your kid can decorate the plastic egg with goggly eyes/sticker eyes and mouth.



ETA 04/13/15: M put playdoh in one end of the plastic egg to make it a wobbly egg. After Humpty fell and broke, he said "egg!," and gave it to me to "eat." X-D

* Age 2 - Week 1

02/50 learning moment ☆ 02/100 moments in multiples of 50 words

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